Citizens for a Livable Cranbrook Society provides grassroots leadership and an inclusive process, with a voice for all community members, to ensure that our community grows and develops in a way that incorporates an environmental ethic, offers a range of housing and transportation choices, encourages a vibrant and cultural life and supports sustainable, meaningful employment and business opportunities.

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Regarding Fire Hall No. 1

Letter to the Editor
March 28, 2015
                                                     Arts and Culture

“ I support the arts and culture” became a well-worn phrase during Cranbrook’s municipal election in the fall of 2014. The first real test of that “support” is now in front of our recently elected Mayor and Council.

The Cranbrook and District Arts Council (CDAC) want to turn historic Fire Hall No. 1 into a vibrant new home for Arts and Culture, which would also continue the revitalization of our downtown. Our newly elected municipal government has a great opportunity to make this happen. How?

Take the notion of selling the Fire Hall off the table. This is an important piece of our history and our culture - it should remain as a public building.

Lease the Fire Hall to the CDAC and structure the lease so that if the Arts Council ever becomes insolvent, the building and all of the improvements return to the city without any compensation. A new roof, improved access for those with disabilities, and a greatly improved interior are not future liabilities for taxpayers.

If there are deficiencies in the CDAC’s Business Plan, have city staff work with them to correct the deficiencies and improve the Plan. This is common practice and demonstrates a partnership approach to improving our community. Improve proponent’s proposals is an important role for staff.

Include funding in the 5 Year Financial Plan to support the CDAC and their efforts to secure a long-term home. This demonstrates to potential grant funders and donors that Cranbrook really does support the arts. As a community we have borrowed and invested millions of dollars in recreation facilities to support healthy bodies. There is much to be said for investing in supporting creativity and healthy souls. 

There are hundreds of thousands of dollars in grants available in support of arts and culture. If that money doesn’t come to Cranbrook it will go to other communities. Having it come here supports our economy at no additional cost to local taxpayers.

There is a real opportunity here to ensure that “I support arts and culture” aren’t just hollow words…

Wayne Stetski





Earth Hour is TODAY. Please turn off your lights and electronics at 8:30pm. Make a statement.

Cranbrook did not even rank last year.  Will we care any more this year?





Earth Hour: B.C. saves equivalent of turning off 1.4 million lights


Public encouraged to lower electricity usage year-round

VANCOUVER — British Columbians saved 65 megawatt hours of electricity and reduced the provincial electricity load by one percent during Earth Hour last night — the equivalent of turning off about 1.4 million lights.
Earth Hour encourages individuals to turn off unnecessary lights and electronics to demonstrate support for climate change reduction efforts. Earth Hour is an annual global event hosted by the WWF.
BC Hydro customers can view their energy use for Saturday evening by logging onto MyHydro — their online account at bchydro.com/myhydro. They can get an hourly breakdown of their electricity use.
BC Hydro provides tools, resources and incentives to help people conserve year-round. For more tips on how to be smart with your power, visit bchydro.com/powersmart. Since 2007, BC Hydro’s Power Smart programs have saved close to 4,300 gigawatt hours per year of electricity – enough to power 390,000 homes annually.
Earth Hour savings by year:
  • 2014: 65 megawatt hours or 1 per cent reduction in overall provincial load
  • 2013: 136 megawatt hours or 1.95 per cent reduction in overall provincial load
  • 2012: 121 megawatt hours or 1.67 per cent reduction in overall provincial load
  • 2011: 117 megawatt hours or  1.8 per cent reduction in overall provincial load
  • 2010: 64.6 megawatt hours or 1.04 per cent reduction in overall provincial load
  • 2009: 72.67 megawatt hours or 1.1 per cent reduction in overall provincial load
  • 2008: 125 megawatt hours or 2 per cent reduction  
B.C. city-by-city savings 2014
  • Whistler 6.0%
  • Esquimalt 5.8%
  • Lytton 4.6%
  • Lumby 4.0%
  • Victoria 3.7%
  • Oak Bay 3.3%
  • One Hundred Mile House 3.3%
  • Saanich 3.2%
  • Sidney 3.2%
  • North Vancouver City 3.0%
  • Prince George 3.0%
  • North Vancouver District 3.0%
  • View Royal 3.0%
  • Highlands 2.8%
  • North Saanich 2.7%
  • Coldstream 2.6%
  • Ladysmith 2.5%
  • Powell River 2.5%
  • Sooke 2.4%
  • Richmond 2.3%
  • Port Coquitlam 2.3%
  • Campbell River 2.2%
  • Port Alberni 2.2%
  • Metchosin 2.1%
  • Colwood 2.1%
  • Langford 2.1%
  • Sayward 2.1%
  • Enderby 2.1%
  • Spallumcheen 2.1%
  • Squamish 2.1%
  • Vancouver 2.1%
  • Sicamous 2.0%
  • Bowen Island 2.0%
  • Burnaby 1.9%
  • Langley City 1.9%
  • Port Moody 1.8%
  • Coquitlam 1.8%
  • Lake Country 1.7%
  • Vernon 1.7%
  • West Vancouver 1.7%
  • Nanaimo 1.7%
  • New Westminster 1.7%
  • Parksville 1.7%
  • Salmon Arm 1.7%
  • Anmore 1.6%
  • Belcarra 1.6%
  • Mission 1.6%
  • Delta 1.6%
  • Fort Nelson 1.5%
  • North Cowichan 1.5%
  • Comox 1.5%
  • Courtenay 1.5%
  • Peachland 1.3%
  • Summerland 1.3%
  • West Kelowna 1.3%
  • Qualicum Beach 1.3%
  • Central Saanich 1.3%
  • Sechelt 1.2%
  • Lantzville 1.1%
  • Chilliwack 0.9%
  • Kamloops 0.9%
  • Surrey 0.9%
  • Duncan 0.8%
  • Maple Ridge 0.7%
  • Langley District 0.7%
  • Tofino 0.7%
  • Ucluelet 0.7%
  • Pitt Meadows 0.6%
  • Abbotsford 0.1%

Friday, March 27, 2015

What's Happening...

Saturday March 28th

Mini Book Sale
Manual Training Building next to Library
9:00am - 4:00pm

Farmer's Market
Ktunaxa Gym
10:00am - 1:00pm

Sunday March 29th

Celtic Tenors at Key City Theatre
7:30pm

Monday March 30th

Shayne Koyczan
"Silence is a song I know all the words to."
Spoken word  artist, poet
7:30pm

Travelogue
Far Above the Clouds
COR Lecture Theatre 7:30pm
Gebhard and Sabine Pfeiffer and Patriocia and David Stock



Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Supporting the Trans Canada Trail

part of the most recently developed part of the trail east of Cranbrook








Post Notes for the Council Meeting of March 23rd 2015

Councillor Popoff absent.

Public Hearing re Bylaw No 3819
OCP land use - light industrial to heavy on Theatre Road.
No presentations.

Delegation

5.1 Cranbrook and District Arts Council,  Sioban Staplin and Bill McColl.  Proposal to develop Fire Hall No 1 into an Arts Centre and Gallery
A considerable time was devoted to questions after this presentation.  Please refer to the report on eKnow for this item.

Bylaws

6.1 Bylaw 3817

To consider "City of Cranbrook Leisure Services Fees and Charges Bylaw No. 3817, 2015", which adjusts Leisure Services Fees and Charges to reflect Council's direction to abolish the resident non-resident fee structure.
Adjustments to the Leisure Services fees and charges will result in a decrease to revenues of approximately $35,000 to $40,000 annually. Approximately $20,000 of this amount is reflected in Sports Pass purchases,while the remainder represents the additional fees non-residents paid for services such as aquatic admissions. It is expected that over time, increased usage from non-residents will gradually increase revenues, offsetting some of this initial budget impact.
The movement to abolish this system has been worked on for a number of years by the previous council.
Three readings. Carried.

6.2 Bylaw 3819
To consider third reading and adoption of a proposed amendment of the Official Community Plan to redesignate part of a property located on Theatre Road from a "Light Industrial" designation to a "Heavy Industrial" designation.
https://cranbrook.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=4645
Adopted

6.3 Bylaw 3820 Zoning
for above

6.4 Bylaw 3822

For Council to repeal Motor Control Center (MCC) Replacement - Spray Irrigation Facility Loan
Authorization Bylaw No. 3812, 2014 so that staff can proceed with a second alternative approval
process as set out in section 86 of the Community Charier to obtain elector approval on a borrowing
not to exceed $700,000.
Upon expiration of the statutory quashing period (which extends for one month after the adoption of
the bylaw), an application was made to the Inspector of Municipalities for a Certificate of Approval.
Unfortunately, the statutory requirement of having the deadline for submission of elector responses
be at least 30 days after the second newspaper publication was not met, being one day short.
Therefore, as the bylaw does not meet statutory requirements, it is prudent that the Motor Control
Center (MCC) Replacement - Spray Irrigation Facility Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 3812, 2014 be
repealed.
Staff is bringing forward, under a separate report recommendation, a new loan authorization bylaw
to initiate the second alternative approval process.
This item was first discussed and voted on in a January Council Meeting.  At the time the need for a new pump and contributing infrastructure was considered urgent.  Council was then informed the item was not as urgent as first thought but the pump still required replacement.  The pump cannot be replaced at this late date as spraying in the sewage irrigation fields begins in May. The City has used the Alternative Approval many times to approve this kind of loan. This time the requirements for submission were not met and the process must be repeated.  Councillor Graham suggested that the funds be found in a surplus account as the City does have healthy surpluses.  CAO explained that the surplus accounts are within recommended guidelines and such things as the 'Sinkhole Sunday' event, (partly casued by a pressure reducing fault and partly by aging water mains) including the severing of a high speed internet cable require surplus funds to be in place.  The estimated cost of severing the cable (alone)was estimated to be $25000. This item resulted in considerable discussion between CAO Staudt, Director of Finance Charlotte Osborne and Councillor Graham. 
Three readings to initiate the AAP process once more by repealing the original bylaw carried.

New Business

8.1  CBK Youth Project
To obtain Council's authorization to continue the City's partnership with the Cranbrook Youth Project, under the oversight of the United Way East Kootenay; and to enter into a contribution agreement with the Columbia Basin Trust for years 3 and 4 of the Cranbrook Community Directed Youth Funds project.
Carried

8.2 Finance and Computer Services
To appoint one member of Council and two alternate members of Council as Municipal Insurance
Association of BC (MIABC) voting delegates.
Councillors Wes Graham and Tom Shypitka.

8.3 Library Board Appointments
Sandy Zeznik and ?

10.1 Administration Update
Urban Deer, Media Release, North Star R2T, Damage to Fibre Optic Public Works, Sink Hole repairs
Please see:

Correspondence
 beginning:



Monday, March 23, 2015

Advance Council Notes for the Meeting of March 23rd, 2015, Council Chambers 6:00pm

Delegation

5.1 Cranbrook and District Arts Council,  Sioban Staplin and Bill McColl.  Proposal to develop Fire Hall No 1 into an Arts Centre and Gallery

Bylaws

6.1 Bylaw 3817

To consider "City of Cranbrook Leisure Services Fees and Charges Bylaw No. 3817, 2015", which adjusts Leisure Services Fees and Charges to reflect Council's direction to abolish the resident non-resident fee structure.
Adjustments to the Leisure Services fees and charges will result in a decrease to revenues of approximately $35,000 to $40,000 annually. Approximately $20,000 of this amount is reflected in Sports Pass purchases,while the remainder represents the additional fees non-residents paid for services such as aquatic admissions. It is expected that over time, increased usage from non-residents will gradually increase revenues, offsetting some of this initial budget impact.

6.2 Bylaw 3819
To consider third reading and adoption of a proposed amendment of the Official Community Plan to redesignate part of a property located on Theatre Road from a "Light Industrial" designation to a "Heavy Industrial" designation.
https://cranbrook.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=4645

6.3 Bylaw 3820 Zoning
for above

6.4 Bylaw 3822

For Council to repeal Motor Control Center (MCC) Replacement - Spray Irrigation Facility Loan
Authorization Bylaw No. 3812, 2014 so that staff can proceed with a second alternative approval
process as set out in section 86 of the Community Charier to obtain elector approval on a borrowing
not to exceed $700,000.
Upon expiration of the statutory quashing period (which extends for one month after the adoption of
the bylaw), an application was made to the Inspector of Municipalities for a Certificate of Approval.
Unfortunately, the statutory requirement of having the deadline for submission of elector responses
be at least 30 days after the second newspaper publication was not met, being one day short.
Therefore, as the bylaw does not meet statutory requirements, it is prudent that the Motor Control
Center (MCC) Replacement - Spray Irrigation Facility Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 3812, 2014 be
repealed.
Staff is bringing forward, under a separate report recommendation, a new loan authorization bylaw
to initiate the second alternative approval process.

New Business

8.1  CBK Youth Project
To obtain Council's authorization to continue the City's partnership with the Cranbrook Youth Project, under the oversight of the United Way East Kootenay; and to enter into a contribution agreement with the Columbia Basin Trust for years 3 and 4 of the Cranbrook Community Directed Youth Funds project.

8.2 Finance and Computer Services
To appoint one member of Council and two alternate members of Council as Municipal Insurance
Association of BC (MIABC) voting delegates.

8.3 Library Board Appointments

10.1 Administration Update
Urban Deer, Media Release, North Star R2T, Damage to Fibre Optic Public Works, Sink Hole repairs

Correspondence
 beginning:





Sunday, March 22, 2015

Water

World Water Day

I always remember a local person telling me, "Oh, we will never run out of water in Cranbrook."   I did not pursue the statement by asking for clarification but once the question becomes, "Water to drink?" "Clean water?" "Water to power the dams year round?" "Water to put out the fires?" "Water enough for food crops?" there is much more to consider.  We do indeed live in an idyllic place but by ignoring situations such as the California drought and fracking contamination in Alberta, it is not hard to see water issues are all around us. While we may be lucky enough to have clean water coming out of our taps every day, Cranbrook is not without its water issues.  One only has to look at the community's budget to see the large sums of money that must be spent every year to feed our water habit and keep the life sustaining need flowing.  An abundance of water does not mean that water, will continue in the future, to be available to us in the consumable forms most of us take for granted. Capturing it, filtering it and disposing of the contaminated effluent for twelve months a year costs time and money and the system will likely never be perfect and the task will only become more difficult.  


The World’s Water Supply Could Dip Sharply in 15 Years
·        

  @aliceparkny March 21, 2015.

A warning ahead of World Water Day
Global water resources may soon meet only 60% of the world’s water demands, the United Nations warned in a dire new report.
The World Water Development Report, issued ahead of World Water Day on Sunday, says demand for water around the world will increase by 55% over the next 15 years. With current supplies, that means only 60% of the world’s water needs will be met in 2030.
The reason for the shortfall include climate change, which causes irregular rainfall and dwindling underwater reserves. The results of the shortage could be devastating to agriculture, ecosystems and economies. With less water, health could also be compromised.
New policies that focus on water conservation, and more optimal treatment of wastewater, could alleviate some of the shortfall.
“Unless the balance between demand and finite supplies is restored, the world will face an increasingly severe global water deficit,” the report says.

H2O keeps us all alive.  We in turn must keep clean water alive. 



Saturday, March 21, 2015

A splash of Spring outside The Gallery

Primula and pansies - tough plants that can handle some cold temperatures.
















No matter how small the splash, it does remind us that Spring always arrives.